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What I Read in September

 
It's October already - I'm not quite sure how that happened! September was a pretty good reading month for me in all - I finished nine books in total and there were some really good ones among them.

Fiction:
 

Precious and the Mystery of Meerkat Hill by Alexander McCall Smith: This was a very simple story, which was enjoyable, but it was definitely aimed at quite a young audience.
 
Robin Hood by David Calcutt: This was quite enjoyable. The stories were fairly basic retellings of Robin Hood legends, but the illustrations were what made it really.
 
Gaudy Night by Dorothy L. Sayers: I thought this was really good - there's a link to my review below.
 
Outcast by Rosemary Sutcliff: This is the second book I've read by Rosemary Sutcliff - I didn't particularly care for The Eagle of the Ninth, but after hearing good things about her books for ages I decided to give them another go - which I'm glad I did, because I really enjoyed this book! I will definitely be seeking out more of her books.
 
My Lady Jane by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton and Jodi Meadows: The alternative story of Lady Jane Grey - with a different ending, and also people turning into animals. It's very entertaining and I would recommend it to all fans of YA and/or historical fiction (although this isn't strictly historical, there are lots of historical delights in store).

Non-Fiction:
 

Behind the Chalet School by Helen McClelland: This was quite an interesting read (as a fan of the Chalet School books), although I didn't feel it was terribly well written.
 
Medieval Wisdom for Modern Christians by Chris Armstrong: This was really good - it gave me a lot to think about. I might do a post about it soon.
 
Waking Up by Ted Dekker: This was very short; I think it made some good points, but it would have been better if things were explored in more detail.

Poetry:
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The Illustrated Book of Romantic Verse: This was a delight; I find poetry a bit hit and miss, but I really liked most of the selections in this book, and the artwork was also good - there were some really lovely pictures. If you like poetry, I would recommend this book.
 
Reviews:
 
Gaudy Night by Dorothy L. Sayers
 
Non-Review Posts:

I participated in Top Ten Tuesday twice - sharing ten of my all-time favourite mystery books and ten books I'm hoping to read this autumn.
I also participated in Classic Remarks for the first time - this week's topic was about favourite Jane Austen adaptations
I listed twenty selections for the next Classics Club Spin - come back tomorrow to find out which book I will be reading!

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