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Monthly Recap: November

How is it already the end of November?! Christmas is nearly here!
 

What I read:
November was a pretty good reading month for me. All of the books I read were pretty good, and there were a few that were really good.
The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien (****) (review)
Whose Body? by Dorothy Sayers (****) (review)
Unequal Affections by Lara S. Ormiston (****)
The Archers of Isca by Caroline Lawrence (****)
The Princess Virginia by A.M. and C.N. Williamson (****) (thoughts on these three)
Penelope's English Experiences by Kate Douglas Wiggin (***) (This was entertaining, but I didn't enjoy it as much as some of the author's other books)
Mother Carey's Chickens by Kate Douglas Wiggin (****) (I really enjoyed this; it reminded me quite a bit of children's classics like Anne of Green Gables and Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm)
The Old Peabody Pew by Kate Douglas Wiggin (***) (Enjoyable, but nothing really happened)
 
Book of the Month: This is actually pretty difficult, because The Fellowship of the Ring was very good, but I feel like in terms of sheer enjoyment, The Archers of Isca probably wins. Whose Body? and Mother Carey's Chickens definitely deserve honorary mentions though, as they were both very good too.

Posts:
 
Currently Reading:
The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien
In Wartime by Tim Judah
God's Undertaker by John Lennox
 
What I Plan to Read Next:
(not that I ever stick to these)
Scarlet by Marissa Meyer
Heartless by Anne Elisabeth Stengl
The Sound of Diamonds by Rachelle Rea
The Growing Summer by Noel Streatfeild
 
I'll probably read some Christmassy books in the next few weeks too, but I haven't quite decided what yet. I'd also like to reread some old favourites, since that is definitely something I've neglected far too much this year.

Comments

  1. Hi Rachel! I have found you after your lovely comment on Ink, Inc. (thank you!). I have to ask about The Archers of Isca!! Because TRM were (are) like my favourite series ever, and that sounds suspiciously like a TMR title?? But it definitely wasn't one of the ones I read when I was younger -- the last one I read/own is The Man From Pomegranate Street. (Over the past year and a bit I have been rereading them, which is a joy. I've got to The Enemies of Jupiter.) So please enlighten me!

    I hope you're enjoying Two Towers. Fellowship is really good, but Towers and Return just take it to another level of wonderful! I need to read Scarlet myself, that is, when I've read Cress ... or is Scarlet #2? I forget. #2, anyway, I need to read; I've only read Cinder! I'm also keen to try some Anne Elisabeth Stengl.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Archers of Isca is actually the second book in a NEW series called Roman Quests which is a spin-off/sequel to The Roman Mysteries. (The first one is called Escape from Rome.) There's a new set of main characters but some of the old characters have made a couple of appearances and (from some revelations in this book) it looks as though it's going to tie up some of the loose threads from the Roman Mysteries series! So you definitely check them out :) The Roman Mysteries series were my favourite as well at one time, although it's been a while since I've read/reread any of them, but I keep meaning to revisit some of them.

      I am enjoying The Two Towers, more than Fellowship I think, although I'm making fairly slow progress (mostly because I'm reading too many other books at once). Scarlet is #2 in The Lunar Chronicles, so I'm looking forward to reading Cress and Winter after I finish that.

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