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Monthly Review: February 2017

What I Read I re-read two books, Saffy's Angel by Hilary McKay and (for the Old School Kidlit challenge) The Tanglewoods' Secret by Patricia St. John. The first of these I enjoyed much more than I did the first time around, the second not as much. I also read quite a lot of other books; mostly classics. I really enjoyed A World of Girls by L.T. Meade, The Prisoner of Zenda by Anthony Hope, A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle, and Half Magic by Edward Eager, and also quite enjoyed The Thirty-Nine Stepsby John Buchan and Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne. In terms of modern books, Alice-Miranda on Holiday by Jacqueline Harvey turned out to be just about as good as the first book in the series; St Grizzle's School for Girls, Goats and Random Boys was quite enjoyable, although a little bit silly, and I felt that A Quiet Kind of Thunder, although not in a genre I read much, presented a good representation of a character struggling with anxiety and sele…

Quote of the Week

Back to the Classics 2017

So I'm a little bit late to the party, but I've decided to sign up for Back to the Classics 2017, hosted by Books and Chocolate. The aim is to read (up to) twelve books from different categories. I'm not sure whether I'll get all twelve of them completed, but I'm going to give it a go! Below is my rough list of what I plan to read (which will probably change). I've left a couple blank as I'm not sure what I'm going to read for them (suggestions welcome). There's still a few days to sign up if you'd like to participate but haven't yet! 1. A 19th century classic: Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte
2. A 20th century classic: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
3. A classic by a woman author: Sylvia's Lovers by Elizabeth Gaskell
4. A classic in translation: The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
5. A classic originally published before 1800: a Shakespeare play
6. A romance classic: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
7. A Gothic or horror classic: Franke…

Books I Didn't Expect to Like as Much as I Did

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week's theme is Books I Liked More/Less Than I Thought I Would. I've decided to go with Books I Liked More Than I Thought I Would, as I decided I'd rather compile a list of books I really enjoyed than ones I didn't like as much.

The first four books are ones I read at school because they were shortlisted for an award, and I had pretty low expectations for some of them, but they all turned out to be pretty good. The others are ones I chose myself and expected to enjoy, but they exceeded my expectations. Airman by Eoin Colfer I read this because it was on the Carnegie shortlist one year, which I was reading through with some others at school. I didn't expect to enjoy it because it looked quite sci-fi-y which wasn't really a genre I enjoyed then. But actually, I really enjoyed it! (It's really more historical than sci-fi; now I'd probably class it as ruritanian). Creature of the Night

Book Review: The Thirty-Nine Steps

Summary: Richard Hannay, recently returned to London after some years in the British colonies, is bored of his life and fed up of English society - until one day a mysterious man turns up in his flat with a rather sensational story. He claims to have uncovered a secret plot, with potentially huge ramifications, and that there are men trying to kill him to prevent him from revealing their secret. When the man is murdered several days later, it seems that his story is indeed true, and Hannay realises that, not only will the men now be after him, but so will the police, as there is strong circumstantial evidence that points to him as the murderer. So he flees to Scotland, where he must try to survive, evading capture by either of the parties after him, long enough to be able to relate the man's story to the relevant authorities - but will they even believe him? I saw the film of this a while ago and enjoyed it, but I didn't remember that much about it. Probably this was a good th…

I Love Austen Week Tag!

Hamlette at Hamlette's Soliloquy is hosting I Love Austen Week this week - a week dedicated to all things Jane Austen! Be sure to check out the festivities here if you feel so inclined. Here are my answers to the week's tag. 1.  Which did you experience first, a Jane Austen book or a movie based on one? My first proper experience with Jane Austen was the 2005 Pride & Prejudice film. I didn't know much about the story beforehand and wasn't quite sure what to expect, but I LOVED it. So I quickly started searching out other film adaptations, and of course the books themselves. I think I had seen at least one film version of each book before reading it.
2.  What is your favourite Austen book? Until a few days ago I would have said Sense & Sensibility, but I've recently started rereading Pride & Prejudice and suspect that it is about to take over. There are just so many good bits that I'd forgotten! 3.  Favourite heroine?  Why do you like her best? This is…