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Footnotes: August 2017


Today I'm excited to be joining in with Footnotes, a new link-up created by Emily and Ashley. This involves posting about a quote each month, based on a prompt they supply. As an avid collector of quotes this sounds like a great idea to me! This month's prompt is a quote from an author. Although there are of course many quotes I could supply, I've gone with the first to spring to my mind, which I like a lot and is from one of my favourite books, Anne of Green Gables:
 
 
This is a quote that always makes me happy; it's a reminder that you don't need lots of money or possessions, that there are more important things like friendship, happiness, and imagination. I love Anne's way of putting it, and I love the description of the sea, too, "all silver and shallow and visions of things not seen"; it does describe very well what it looks like in the evening.

There, I don't think my explanation has really done justice at all, and there are so many other good quotes that I could have chosen to share. However, they will have to wait for future months!

Photo Credit: Unsplash

Comments

  1. Love that line! And I agree with it, too :-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Rachel! I only just saw that you'd linked up with us! Thank you sooo much -- we really appreciate you getting involved. I smiled so much when I saw you'd shared an Anne quotation! Those books are some of my favourites, and she is probably my favourite female character ever. Anne's description of the sea is so beautiful! And I love the youthfulness of that quotation, and the hope that suffuses it.

    Again, thanks so much for getting involved! I hope I will see you more around the blogosphere. Now going to check out some of your other posts :)

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