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Monthly Recap: January

 
What I Read:
I read two non-fiction books this month: Orthodoxy by G.K. Chesterton (which I enjoyed, and will probably post about at some point), and The Year 1000 by Robert Lacey and Danny Danziger, which was a fascinating book about life around the time of the first millennium (the early Middle Ages happens to be one of my current favourite historical periods, but there aren't that many books about it, so I was glad to find this).

Fiction-wise, I re-read two books, Raider's Tide by Maggie Prince, a tale of marauding Scots, growing up and (maybe) romance in sixteenth-century England; and The Little Duke by Charlotte Mary Yonge, set in tenth-century Normandy. I also read The Long Vacation, also by Charlotte Mary Yonge, and A Portrait of Emily Price by Katherine Reay.

Reading Challenges:
Old School Kidlit Challenge: This month's theme was Award Winners; I was reading The Circus is Coming by Noel Streatfeild, which won the Carnegie medal in 1938, but I haven't got around to finishing it yet. I do still intend to, but it's not top of my reading list at the moment. Hopefully I will do better with next month's theme, which is Books You Loved in Childhood. I plan to re-read The Tanglewoods' Secret by Patricia St. John, which I really enjoyed at the age of about six or seven, but have never revisited. It's pretty short, so it shouldn't be too difficult to fit it in.

Mount TBR: I didn't actually get anything finished this month; but I've made progress on some books that I'm still reading, so hopefully I'll get some finished soon.

I also set a goal for myself to read 12 non-fiction books and 12 re-reads this year; I'm currently ahead on both of these, so that's good :)

Posts:
I joined in with Top Ten Tuesday, listing ten underrated books I've read recently.
I also posted a reading challenge sign-up post, and a list of books I'm looking forward to reading this year. I haven't read any of them yet, but hopefully will get to some next month!

Currently Reading:
As usual I have quite a lot of books on the go! I'm reading The Abbess of Whitby by Jill Dalladay, A Quiet Kind of Thunder by Sara Barnard, The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien, Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis, L is for Lifestyle by Ruth Valerio, and Millennium by Tom Holland. (As well as a few others that I pick up occasionally.)

Comments

  1. Thanks for participating in the Old School Kidlit Reading Challenge. I love Noel Streatfeild! If you do happen to finish reading The Circus is Coming, you are welcome to link up your review in this post any time: http://www.readathomemom.com/2017/01/january-link-up-old-school-kidlit.html

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    Replies
    1. Thanks - good to know! I'm planning to finish it soon :)

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  2. Consider the sheer amount of books I read, I'm shamed to say that I've heard of barely any of these authors. However, The Two Towers is a book I'd adore to read! Tolkien is a genius, although most of his books I've tried reading I've given up during it, like with Lord of The Rings. Hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of pages, it takes a lot for me to commit to a book for so long!

    Amy;

    Little Moon Elephant

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    Replies
    1. There are just so many books out there to read! I think some of the books I read this month were pretty obscure, so I'm not surprised you haven't heard of many of them :)

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