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Reading Challenges

Completed books are in bold.


Mount TBR
Goal: 24 books
1. Saffy's Angel by Hilary McKay
2. The Tanglewoods' Secret by Patricia St. John
3. A Wiltshire Diary by Francis Kilvert (DNF)
4. L is for Lifestyle by Ruth Valerio
5. Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis
6. The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien
7. St. Peter's Fair by Ellis Peters
8. A Man of Some Repute by Elizabeth Edmondson
9. I Am With You by Kathryn Greene-McCreight
10. Scarlet by Marissa Meyer
11. Forged in the Fire by Ann Turnbull
12. The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien

Old School Kidlit Reading Challenge
January - Award winners: The Circus is Coming by Noel Streatfeild (Carnegie Medal)
February - Books from your childhood: The Tanglewoods' Secret by Patricia St. John
March - Published prior to 1945
April - Fantasy: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis (read but not reviewed)
May - Animal stories
June - Required reading (books typically assigned in school)
July - Family stories: Jane of Lantern Hill by L.M. Montgomery
August - Non-fiction
September - School stories: The Manor House School by Angela Brazil and End of Term by Antonia Forest
October - Mysteries
November - Published in the year of your birth
December - Winter stories

Back to the Classics
1. A 19th century classic: Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte
2. A 20th century classic: Mr. Midshipman Hornblower by C.S. Forester
3. A classic by a woman author: Have His Carcase by Dorothy L. Sayers
4. A classic in translation: The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
5. A classic originally published before 1800: a Shakespeare play
6. A romance classic: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
7. A Gothic or horror classic: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
8. A classic with a number in the title: The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan
9. A classic about an animal or which includes the name of an animal in the title: ?
10. A classic set in a place you'd like to visit: Jane of Lantern Hill by L.M. Montgomery
11. An award-winning classic: A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
12. A Russian classic: ?

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